Happy Holidays! Here are my top research moments of 2016!

Team TBS (left to right: Abhinav Grover, Denez Zahra Bokhari, Muhammad Inzamam Tahir, Muhammad Tahsin Sharif)

Team TBS (left to right: Abhinav Grover, Denez Zahra Bokhari, Muhammad Inzamam Tahir, Muhammad Tahsin Sharif)

As the holidays quickly approach us I wanted to take a moment to reflect on the incredible year that the MS community has had in terms of advances in research.

This year, the MS Society of Canada and MS Scientific Research Foundation announced the publication of a landmark clinical trial that they jointly funded over 15 years ago. The trial, led by The Ottawa Hospital’s Dr. Mark Freedman and Dr. Harold Atkins, propelled Canada to the forefront of stem cell research for MS, and is considered one of the most successful stem cell trials for MS to date.

Jennifer Molson, one of the patients who received the procedure that involved immunoablation and transplantation of hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem cells, has become a fervent advocate for stem cell research and continues to publically share her journey throughout and after the clinical trial. Publication of the results of the trial has heightened the MS community’s understanding of the applications that stem cells have for MS, and paved the way for ongoing research that will hopefully lead to stem cell treatments that can be broadly used to treat all types of MS.

This year the MS Society awarded funding for two new projects focused on translation of progressive MS research findings into potential treatments for people living with progressive disease, but also those who have relapsing-remitting MS who are at risk of transitioning to progressive MS. These projects involved collaboration with the Centre for Drug Research in Development, a non-profit drug develop research centre based on Vancouver that possess an inerdiplinary drug development team and fully integrated research facility.

Throughout the year the MS community voiced a deep interest in understanding the effects of environment and lifestyle on the cause, development and severity of MS. We heard questions such as, “does low vitamin D increase risk for MS?”, and, “if I have MS will taking vitamin D help to manage my disease and symptoms?” People also wanted to know if diet and physical activity can help to treat MS or curtail symptoms like fatigue, mobility impairment, spasticity and pain.

To address these questions and gaps, the MS Society announced funding for three wellness-focused research studies, which will involve a team-based approach between academic researchers and community-based organizations. We also awarded a $15,000 grant to a group of students from the University of Waterloo in Ontario named Team TBS (pictured above) that would enable them to develop a wearable device that transmits information about a person’s MS symptoms to an app. The goal is to use the data that is stored in the app to identify any trends or changes that could help one’s healthcare team make informed treatment decisions. The group is nearly done the project and is looking to launch the new technology in 2017.

Additionally, in March of this year, the MS Society brought together the world’s leading experts in vitamin D and MS, and hosted a one-day meeting in March in which they discussed the latest data on the relationship between vitamin D and MS. Based on their discussions, the expert panel developed a series of guidelines on vitamin D testing and intake that is currently under review before they are translated into recommendations for the general public. The hope is that these recommendations will not only inform people affected by MS how much vitamin D they can safely take and whether the data suggests that it can help with their disease, but also provide a more clear understanding of what vitamin D is and the role it plays in MS.

This year the International Progressive MS Alliance announced $18 million in funding for three large projects that will involve global networks of MS researchers. One of these projects will be led by Canadian imaging pioneer Dr. Doug Arnold from McGill University. I am very excited to see whether these projects lead and am confident that the collaborative effort that is being undertaken by each group is the best way to go in terms of expediting the search for new treatments for progressive MS.

Finally, this year could not have ended on a better note than with the 2016 endMS Conference. While it was a busy time of planning and preparations, I am sure I speak on behalf of my MS Society colleagues when I say that it was an amazing conference! I enjoyed hearing about the latest research in the MS, while interacting with MS researchers and clinicians who seemed just as enthusiastic. I saw many familiar faces, but also a lot of new faces which is encouraging as it tells me that the field is expanding and new trainees and investigators are joining the fight to endMS.

I was truly impressed by the intellect, innovation, maturity, professionalism and passion that was evident in each trainee platform and poster presentation that I witnessed throughout the week. I also enjoyed hearing the trainees answer questions from senior researchers and participate in lively discussions during the panels. Another favourite moment of the conference for me was HEAR MS Day. Over 70 people affected by MS came together to meet with the trainees and talk about what MS research means to them and what the impact of research is on their lives. The exchange of dialogue, stories, and perspectives around the room was inspiring for all of us who took part in it, and I hope that we can do more of these types of interactive workshops in the future!

These are only a few of the many noteworthy research moments that have made 2016 an exceptional year for research. It brings me a lot of hope to know that the MS research community is working hard to answer the complex questions about MS that still remain, while working with the clinicians to develop and provide tools for earlier detection, individualized treatment, and comprehensive care. I look forward to seeing the progress of these studies in 2017, and await the next major advances that will move the needle in our search for a cure.

On behalf of the MS Society I wish all of you Happy Holidays!

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