Category Archives: Uncategorized

ACTRIMS 2018: Cutting Edge Development in MS Research

Presenters at the cutting-edge developments in MS session deliver the newest key findings of pivotal studies. At the session, we heard about a novel therapeutic involved in remyelination, pathways that inhibit remyelination, a genetic risk factor that may also target the cell functions in the central nervous system, and reduced adverse events with extended interval dosing of an approved disease-modifying therapy.

Read on for highlights from the #ACTRIMS2018 cutting edge developments in MS research session.

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Happy New Year! Here are my three top research moments of 2017!

new year post

Happy New Year! It’s the time of year many of us make that list of New Year’s resolutions whether it’s being healthier, getting organized, being happier or something else. For many of you affected by MS, one hope you have is to stay well through your very personal journey.

Happily, 2018 seems promising for another year of discoveries. The MS Society continues to fund some of the world’s most groundbreaking MS research—research that has improved quality of life for people affected by MS. So here’s to another year of life-changing scientific advances like those we saw in 2017:

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MSParis2017: The gut continues to be an area of active MS research

Bacteria backgroundThe trillions of bacteria that call the intestines home collectively make up the gut microbiome. Bacteria in the gut do much more than digest food and break it down into nutrients; they are involved in many biological functions including metabolic processes and regulating aspects of our immune system. Researchers are learning that these tiny creatures are important in the general maintenance of good health and are incredibly sensitive to change. Disruption of gut bacteria has been implicated in a host of health conditions including diabetes, obesity and autoimmune diseases like inflammatory bowel disorder and multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies have shown that certain strains of bacteria are elevated in individuals with MS but not in healthy individuals. We will be hearing more about the role the gut microbiome plays in the development, prevention, and treatment of MS in the coming years.

Already, the gut microbiome was an area of great interest at the #MSParis2017 conference this year. Here are highlights of the research discussed in the talks of Dr. Hartmut Wekerle and Dr. Helen Tremlett.

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Aging and comorbidities: a hot topic at the #MSParis2016 conference

Comorbidities (when someone is living with more than one condition) are common in MS and can affect people at the onset of their disease, and are even more prevalent in the aging MS population. Evidence presented at the 7th Joint ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS meeting in Paris, France on October 24-28, 2017 by Dr. Ruth Ann Marrie (University of Manitoba) suggests that comorbidities are associated with a negative impact on outcomes including an increase in disability progression, hospitalizations, mortality and a change in response to fatigue management. Aging is associated with certain comorbidities in the general population, and is no different in people living with chronic conditions such as MS. The most common comorbidities for people with MS were diabetes, heart disease, hypertension (high blood pressure), hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol) and peripheral vascular disease. In the aging MS population, comorbidities may appear at a time when disability progression is increasing and management of the disease is more challenging.

According to a separate Canadian study[1], the number of people living with MS over the age of 55 is increasing. It is postulated that this is due to improved quality of life of patients and the availability of more effective treatments for MS.

As people living with MS age, the risk of certain comorbidities increases. The need for multi-disciplinary, patient-centred care for prevention and treatment of comorbidity in people living with MS is critical in the overall management of the disease, especially within the aging MS population.

[1] Ploughman M, Beaulieu S, Harris C, et al. The Canadian survey of health, lifestyle and ageing with multiple sclerosis: methodology and initial results. BMJ Open 2014;4: e005718. doi:10.1136/ bmjopen-2014-005718

2017 revisions to MS diagnostic criteria presented at #MSParis2017 conference

checklistThe McDonald criteria for MS was first established in 2001 by neurologist Ian McDonald and his team of researcher to diagnose individuals with MS with speed and sensitivity. The criteria include guidelines on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) evidence, clinical exams and the use of cerebrospinal fluid (fluid found in the brain and spinal cord, collectively called the central nervous system or CNS) to assist with the diagnosis of MS. Since then, it has undergone three separate revisions; the first took place in 2005, the second in 2010 and most recently, in 2017. The International Panel on Diagnosis of MS revised the 2010 McDonald criteria which was presented at the 7th Joint ECTRIMS/ACTRIMS meeting in Paris, France on October 24-28, 2017. The 2017 revisions were spurred by new data/research since the 2010 revision was released and now allow for an earlier and more efficient diagnosis of MS. The new data has lead to: a better understanding of MS including diagnostic strategies with more sensitivity, greater knowledge of conditions that mimic MS (which can result in misdiagnosis) and revised MRI criteria. The 2017 criteria lessen the risk of misdiagnosis, and most importantly, people can be diagnosed earlier and begin treatment right away.

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Researchers at #MSParis2017 talk about the factors regulating the Blood Brain Barrier in MS

BBBThe blood-brain barrier (BBB) was highlighted in a session at the #MSParis2017 conference where researchers presented their recent findings on the relationship between the BBB and MS. The BBB is a network of cells (called endothelial cells) that line all the blood vessels in the brain. These cells are so tightly connected that they prevent harmful substances such as bacteria and toxins from entering the brain and spinal cord (collectively called the central nervous system or CNS).  In MS, the BBB is compromised and becomes leaky, allowing white blood cells from the immune system to pass through the barrier and enter the CNS. The white blood cells then attack myelin (the coating around the nerve cells in the CNS) which results in inflammation and lesions. Many research teams are examining what causes the BBB to weaken and ways to prevent this from happening.

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Diet and MS: What does research tell us about supplements?

A question I frequently receive is: “Are there supplements I can take to manage my MS?” MS impacts the day-to-day lives of those living with the disease, so it’s no surprise that many individuals explore complementary and alternative medications (CAMs) to take control of their MS. CAMs are approaches that come from a variety of traditions and practices, including exercise, natural health products, supplements and vitamins. In addition to helping in the management of MS, CAMs are used by Canadians to enhance their overall wellness.

There are a variety of small studies that have looked at the role of CAMs in MS, however their effects are unclear. One area that is growing in interest are the role of supplements as potential treatments. In this post, I will touch on three supplements that have recently gained some traction among the MS research community – vitamin D, biotin, and lipoic acid.

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Why #BurgersToBeatMS is critical to advancing research in Canada

 

20900550_10155863739382494_8699766386079112798_oBurgers to Beat MS day raises funds to help improve the lives of Canadians living with multiple sclerosis. This fundraising campaign led the MS Society of Canada in partnership with A&W Food Services of Canada Inc has already raised over $9 million over the past 8 years, and this year A&W increased their donation to $2 from every Teen Burger® sold across the country on this day. Burgers to Beat MS creates an opportunity for people across the country to come together to support Canadian-led efforts to better understand MS and find a cure, while enjoying a delicious Teen Burger®.

The cause of MS is still a mystery and researchers continue to examine ways to prevent, diagnose and treat this highly unpredictable and often debilitating disease.  Support from A&W allows the MS Society to invest in innovative research, support international research collaborations, and translate discoveries from ideas to new clinical tools and treatments.

Here are some projects that would not be possible without the amazing fundraising efforts of A&W and other dedicated partners and volunteers of the MS Society:

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Hack4Health team Roze receives MS Society funding to develop new fatigue management resource

Team Roze at Hack4Health 2.0. Pictured (left to right): Lisa Loiselle (Co-chair), Lori-Ann Williams, Marium Kirmani, Rui Su, Karla Boluk (Co-chair)

Team Roze at Hack4Health 2.0. Pictured (left to right): Lisa Loiselle (Co-chair), Lori-Ann Williams, Marium Kirmani, Rui Su, Karla Boluk (Co-chair)

I recently had the opportunity to interview Roze, a team of University of Waterloo students and the winners of last Fall’s annual Hack4Health competition hosted by the university. Hack4Health is a 36-hour innovation marathon bringing together students from multi-disciplinary fields working together to design a technology-based project on new wellness solutions for people living with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Check out a previous blog post about the Hack4Health program and winners of the 2015 competition.

The members of team Roze – which include Lori-Ann Williams, Marium Kirmani, Rui Su and Tina Chan –bring experience from different areas: public health, pharmacy, software development and informatics. These talented ladies were excited about the opportunity to learn about MS and other neurodegenerative diseases as well as how they could contribute their skills of intersecting technology and health to make improvements in the quality of life for people living with MS. At Hack4Health, they pitched the idea of an app that promotes appropriate physical activity for women living with MS to help cope with and potentially reduce fatigue, one of the most common symptoms of MS.  As the winners of the competition, they were selected to work with a supervisor to further develop their project with the help of a $15,000 grant from the MS Society of Canada.

In my interview with team Roze, I learned more about what motivated them to participate in Hack4Health, their fatigue-based technology, and a bit about the members of the team themselves.

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