Monthly Archives: March 2018

Celebrating Brain Awareness Week by understanding Brain Health in MS

32794072843_6d027dc9a0_oBrain Awareness Week, happening this year from March 12 to 18, is a global campaign organized by Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives to increase awareness of the benefits of brain research while promoting public interest in neuroscience research. In recognition of this week, I’m discussing brain health in multiple sclerosis with a focus on the MS Brain Health Report. Titled Brain Health: Time matters in multiple sclerosis, the report offers evidence-based recommendations focused on diagnostics, therapeutic strategies, and improving access to treatment. It was developed by a group of international experts in MS under the guidance of Dr. Gavin Giovannoni, Chair of Neurology at the Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. The MS Society of Canada was one of the many organizations to endorse the recommendations made in the report.

The MS Brain Health Report is divided into six key chapters focusing on: (1) the burden of MS; (2) speeding up diagnosis; (3) early interventions to maximize brain health; (4) monitoring and treating MS; (5) acting quickly on disease activity; and (6) approaches to understand cost-benefits of treatments. Together, these chapters make up an extensive summary! Below are some key points from each section to give a flavour of the Report.

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International Women’s Day: Highlighting female scientists that are advancing research in MS

InternationalWomensDayFor more than a century people around world have been celebrating International Women’s Day (IWD) on March 8th. The theme for this year’s IWD is #PressforProgress based on a need for gender parity. In addition to this year’s goal to #PressforProgres, IWD celebrates the achievements of women all around the world. When speaking of the achievements of women and bringing it locally, Dr. Pamela Valentine was appointed President and CEO of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada this year.  In Multiple Sclerosis (MS), more women than men are diagnosed with the disease that means more women are managing a disease while also juggling the everyday hurdles of life. So, in today’s post I wanted to highlight the research projects conducted by a couple of the female researchers we support that are working tirelessly to find ways to improve the quality of life of all people living with MS.

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