Monthly Archives: November 2016

The faces behind the research: Spotlight on wellness and MS, Part III

Last week, I featured a team led by Dr. Ann Yeh from SickKids Hospital who was awarded one of three Hermès Canada | MS Society Wellness Research Innovation Grants to develop a physical activity app for children and adolescents living with MS. In the last part of this series, we’ll set our sights back on Saskatchewan and focus on Dr. Katherine Knox, Associate Professor at the University of Saskatchewan, who is working collaboratively with community innovator Dalene Newton, Director of Brain Health, Rehabilitation, and Interprofessional Practice, at Saskatoon Health Region. Their project is titled “Web-based physiotherapy in moderate to severe MS”.

Meet the Researcher: Katherine Knox

knox_photo

Photo credit: Katherine Knox

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The faces behind the research: Spotlight on wellness and MS, Part II

As part of an ongoing series, I will be featuring interviews with the talented researchers and community innovators who were awarded one of three Hermès Canada | MS Society Wellness Research Innovation Grants to give you a glimpse at the amazing personalities and stories behind the research. Last week, I featured one of the teams from Saskatoon who have set out to study the impact of a Pilates program in people living with MS. This week, I’ll be featuring Dr. Ann Yeh,  who is an Associate Professor of Paediatrics at University of Toronto and Staff Neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children, and community innovator Adam McKillop, President and CEO of Kite & Canary, the digital design and development company tasked with developing a physical activity mobile application (app) for children and adolescents living with MS. The study is titled “Development and Usability Testing of the ATOMIC (Active Teens MultIple sClerosis) Mobile App to Increase Physical Activity Levels in Youth with Multiple Sclerosis”

Meet the Researcher: Dr. Ann Yeh

Dr. Ann Yeh

Dr. Ann Yeh

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The faces behind the research: Spotlight on wellness and MS, Part I

Today, the MS Society announced the three recipients of the Hermès Canada | MS Society Wellness Research Innovation Grant. Each grant recipient will receive $40,000 over one year to embark on a research study that will lead to a better understanding of wellness and how to integrate physical activity and rehabilitation approaches into MS care and lifestyle for people affected by MS. I’m very excited to see these grants out the door as they represent the culmination of more than a year of planning and consultation with the MS community. This included the valuable feedback on wellness priorities gathered through the MS Wellness Survey, the contribution of our community representatives on the independent review panel for the grants, and the ongoing involvement of people affected by MS in each of the projects as a central pillar of their community engagement strategies.

I’m also excited to learn more about the amazing people who have taken the reins on these studies. Each one of them brings to their study their unique expertise in wellness and/or MS, along with deep roots in their local communities, in a perfect mix that makes them well-positioned to tackle gaps in wellness faced by people affected by MS.

In this multi-part series, I will be featuring interviews with each of the researchers and community innovators leading their respective Hermès Canada | MS Society Wellness Research Innovation Grants to give you a glimpse at the amazing personalities and stories behind the research. This week, we’ll focus on Dr. Charity Evans, Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Saskatchewan, and Jana and Jason Danielson, co-owners of multidisciplinary health and wellness studio Lead Integrated Health Therapies, and their study titled “Determining the Impact of a Pilates Program in Multiple Sclerosis”

Meet the Researcher: Charity Evans

Photo credit: Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation

Photo credit: Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation

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Hack4Health: Innovative MS wellness solutions take centre-stage

It feels like only yesterday that Team Tera Bio Solutions (TBS), a group of creative, young science and engineering students at University of Waterloo, were awarded $15,000 from the MS Society to create a technological concept and develop it into a wellness tool for people living with multiple sclerosis. The blueprint for this tool was borne out of Hack4Health, a “hackathon” based at University of Waterloo in September last year in which teams of students were given 36 caffeine-fueled hours to put their heads together and develop wellness solutions with the potential to improve quality of life for people living with MS or dementia. To guide their thought process, participants of Hack4Health relied on the wellness priorities expressed by the MS community, both through the MS Wellness Survey and through interacting with people living with MS who acted as mentors during the event. Fast forward one year, and Team TBS is a few steps closer to completing the prototype for its wellness concept. So what has Team TBS been working on since their project kicked off earlier this year, and what inspired them to pursue this approach in the first place?

Team TBS (left to right: Abhinav Grover, Denez Zahra Bokhari, Muhammad Inzamam Tahir, Muhammad Tahsin Sharif)

Team TBS (left to right: Abhinav Grover, Denez Zahra Bokhari, Muhammad Inzamam Tahir, Muhammad Tahsin Sharif)

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